Meet Uplifting Athletes 2019 Rare Disease Champion Team member Anthony Lotti from University of Pennsylvania


Starting this season, the focus of the Rare Disease Champion Award shifted to a team concept in order to provide a platform to recognize all the qualified leaders that have made a significant and lasting impact on the Rare Disease Community. The Rare Disease Champion Team ensures all the inspiring rare disease stories of qualified leaders in college football are shared and celebrated. Uplifting Athletes will honor the 2019 Rare Disease Champion Team at the Maxwell Football Club Awards Gala in Atlantic City and at the Uplifting Athletes Young Investigator Draft in Philadelphia March 6 and 7, respectively.

Anthony Lotti

University: University of Pennsylvania

Vitals: 6-1, 190-pound, junior, student assistant/manager

Quick Hits: Anthony made the selfless decision to sign up to donate his bone marrow through Penn’s “Be The Match” program. While studying for finals in April of 2019, he found out he was a match with a leukemia patient and he arranged to donate his bone marrow over the summer during a break from football. As Anthony prepared for his bone marrow transplant, he was also recovering from a severe shoulder injury. His plan was to return to the field, but the injury was too severe and resulted in nerve damage that ended his football playing career. He’s still part of the Quakers team, serving as a student assistant coach and sending in defensive signals.

INSIDE THE STORY

The native of Freehold, New Jersey was thinking ahead when it came time to choose a college.

Anthony had a dozen offers to play football from colleges at both the FBS and FCS levels. And football was extremely important to the defensive back who was an all-state star in high school.

He had plenty of options, but in the end, the combination of an Ivy League education and the football program at Penn made it an easy decision for Anthony.

That decision would end up having lift altering ramifications for Anthony on a couple fronts.

Shortly after arriving on campus he learned about the Penn football program’s commitment to the “Be The Match” bone marrow transplant registry. It was such an easy process, as Anthony said, registering was a no-brainer.

And then, in his own words, he kind of forgot about signing up before getting a phone call during finals week in the spring of 2019 while studying in the library.

The call had exquisite timing for Anthony, because he was struggling. Not long before being told he was a match to become a bone marrow transplant donor, the junior found out his football playing days were over.

“Football was part of my life for 12 years. I just loved the game. It was my outlet for everything in my life. And in the blink of an eye it was suddenly gone,” Anthony said. “When I got the call for a match it gave me a new perspective on life. It put me right back on track and my life is going great again.”

During preseason camp prior to the 2018 season, Anthony was vying for playing time as a starting safety for the Quakers defense. Already battling a torn labrum in his left shoulder, Anthony suffered a much larger injury in the same shoulder during practice. He tore his rotator cuff and shattered his scapula (shoulder blade) on the same play and headed for surgery and rehab.

The plan was for him to return to practice during Spring Ball on a limited basis and, once fully recovered, resume vying for playing time at safety. That was the plan, at least. When he started working out to get ready for his return, he noticed severe numbness in his left arm. The diagnosis was that his injury also caused nerve damage and he was told his football playing days were over.

Several weeks later he received the call from Be The Match.

“My dad said something to me that really stood out and has stayed with me,” Anthony said. “He told me that I wouldn’t be part of Be The Match if I didn’t have football. He also told me doing the bone marrow transplant has way more impact than the 12 years you played football.”

Being medically disqualified has not stopped Anthony from staying involved with the football program, though. Last season he served as a student assistant/manager – in his words doing a little bit of anything I can to help out – and plans to do it again for his senior season in 2020.

THE RARE JOURNEY

You have less than a 1 percent chance of being picked to become a bone marrow transplant donor when you sign up for a registry.

Anthony became the fifth Penn football player, the first since 2016, to donate since the Quakers’ football team paired up with Be The Match a dozen years ago.

Be The Match was started by former Villanova Head Football Coach Andy Talley, who has dedicated more than 18 years to raising awareness about the need for marrow donors and increasing the likelihood that all patients receive the life-saving transplant they need. In addition to Penn, more than 100 college football programs participate in the program annually.

More than 18 months after joining the registry, Anthony found out he was a match for a 37-year-old mother who was battling leukemia.

All Anthony could think about was how grateful he was to be able to donate to a mom. He has a strong relationship with his mom and his recipient’s children weighed heavily on his mind as he went through three months of intensive blood tests prior to donating his bone marrow.

“Anybody you can donate too, that’s all you care about when you sign up,” Anthony said. “But being told the patient was a mom and knowing the impact my mom had on me … I wanted her kids to have the same opportunity. Based on her age, they are probably young kids, it was a special moment for me.”

This summer Anthony will find out of his bone marrow donation turned out. The standard buffer for a transplant and success is a year. If it turned out to be a success, he will have the opportunity to meet the mother and her family if they consent.

During the process of getting ready for his donation procedure, Anthony relied on teammate Sam Phillip, who donated after the 2016 football season, for advice.

So when the duo was summoned to what they thought was a Skype interview promoting and talking about Penn football and the Be The Match program, it’s safe to say they were shocked when NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell suddenly appeared on the screen.

“Yeah that was kind of crazy. We were staring at a blank screen waiting for the interview to start and Roger Goodell sits down,” Anthony said. “It was all very confusing and happened so fast.”

Goodell surprised the duo by announcing they were each receiving tickets to Super Bowl LIV, along with a guest, in Miami as part of the NFL’s commitment to rewarding members of the football community who have performed selfless acts.

 WHAT THEY SAID

“It wasn’t the storybook ending I wanted and pictured for my football career. I envisioned myself playing and winning an Ivy League championship. That wasn’t my lot in life. I’m proud of my football career and I learned a lot about myself as a student-athlete. I wanted to use football to get a great education and that’s why I chose Penn. Not only am I getting a great education, but because I chose Penn, I’ve acquired an invaluable life lesson by becoming a bone marrow transplant donor.” – Anthony Lotti

39 Uplifting Athletes Chapter Leaders put through paces in Atlanta during 11th annual Leadership Development Conference


The cornerstone of the Uplifting Leaders program is our network of Chapters on campuses across the country led by college football student-athletes.

This past weekend, 39 leaders from 20 schools gathered in Atlanta for a high impact and fast paced weekend of learning and development during our 11th annual Uplifting Athletes Leadership Development Conference.

The 2020 conference provided an opportunity for our Chapter leadership to develop relationships that stretch beyond the football field, to absorb enhanced mission and vision insight based on Uplifting Athletes’ four programs – Rare Disease Awareness, Rare Disease Research, Uplifting Experiences and Uplifting Leaders – and to plot a chapter strategy for 2020.

“The difference for me this year was it’s a new group of guys mostly, but you establish similar quality of relationships,” said Clemson Chapter leader and Tigers’ long snapper Jack Maddox, who was attending his second conference. “I have a year of experience now, so I know more about what’s going on. I’m not overwhelmed as much and I know what we can and can’t do at our chapter. It’s such a valuable weekend.”

Following a meet-and-greet dinner Friday night, the conference kicked off Saturday with a full day of programming. Four breakout sessions led by Uplifting Athletes staff were followed by an “entering the real world” question-and-answer session with former college athletes.

The highlight of Saturday was the Uplifting Experience at the College Football Hall of Fame where 24 rare disease patients, caregivers and families were connected with the Chapter leaders to spend a couple hours experiencing the Hall of Fame together.

“I loved that the athletes had an opportunity to meet individuals with rare diseases outside of a hospital setting,” said Carol Unger, whose 32-year-old son Matthew is diagnosed with the ultra rare disease WAGR Syndrome. “I feel it is important to note that our children grow up, although some may still be at the maturity level of a 7 or 8 year old, and cherish those opportunities to meet with folks from the outside world.”

The first day of the conference closed out with a work session on three of Uplifting Athletes’ main events – Lift For Life, Reps For Rare Diseases and Touchdown Pledge Drive.

“Since Penn State is such an established chapter, my journey here is to learn what else can we do next to help support the Rare Disease Community,” said Penn State Chapter leader and long snapper Chris Stoll, who is in line to be the next PSU Chapter President taking over for quarterback Sean Clifford.

“I’m very excited to be more involved at another level. Sean did a great job and put a lot into it. But he’s our starting quarterback now and that’s a big job. I’m pumped to be here again and to meet so many guys who have passion for the rare disease cause and for using their platform to make a difference. And I’m very excited to get more involved at the next level.”

Sunday started with Dr. David Fajgenbaum, a former Uplifting Athletes Young Investigator Draft grant recipient, founder of the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network and rare disease research pioneer, sharing his story via a live video conference.

The conference wrapped up with some additional highlights of Uplifting Athletes’ programming that is available to support the rare disease cause and a work session to kick off 2020 at the chapter level.

A special thank you to all our sponsors and supporters who made this conference possible, Deloitte, Sanofi Genzyme, Jean Campbell and JFC Consulting and the College Football Hall of Fame. With your help, these young men are making a difference in the Rare Disease Community.

Meet the 2019 Uplifting Athletes Rare Disease Champion Team


Uplifting Athletes is pleased to announce the 2019 Uplifting Athletes Rare Disease Champion Team.

For 12 years, Uplifting Athletes has recognized a Rare Disease Champion. Starting in 2019, the focus of the Rare Disease Champion Award shifts from highlighting an individual leader in college football to a team concept that provides an opportunity to recognize leaders in college football that have made a positive and lasting impact on the Rare Disease Community. 

The five members of the 2019 Uplifting Athletes Rare Disease Champion team are: Kent State wide receiver Antwan Dixon, Davidson linebacker George Hatalowich, Syracuse offensive lineman Sam Heckel, Penn student assistant Anthony Lotti and Kentucky linebacker Josh Paschal.

Uplifting Athletes couldn’t be more proud to share these inspiring rare disease stories of leaders in college football.

“We feel strongly that our obligation to the Rare Disease Community is to share the powerful and compelling stories of people inside college football who have lived the rare disease journey, as patients and advocates,” Uplifting Athletes Executive Director Rob Long said. “I believe this will be the start of a tradition recognizing those in college football who are inspiring, serving and supporting those who need it the most.”

The Rare Disease Champion Team powered by Sanofi Genzyme is an Uplifting Athletes awareness campaign that is part of the National College Football Awards Association (NCFAA). The Rare Disease Champion Team will be celebrated at the Maxwell Football Club Awards Gala at the Tropicana Casino & Resort in Atlantic City, N.J. on March 6, 2020 and at Uplifting Athletes’ Young Investigator Draft at Lincoln Financial Field Philadelphia March 7, 2020.

Nominees for the award were solicited from any NCAA FBS, FCS, Division II or Division III institution or college football program nationwide.

Past Rare Disease Champion winners consist of seven FBS players including USC long snapper Jake Olson (2016), UCF linebacker Shaquem Griffin (2018) and Auburn wide receiver Sammie Coates (2015), one FCS player, a Division III quarterback, an FBS assistant coach and an administrator from AFCA. 

Former Austin Peay State University Offensive Coordinator and current University of Kansas Assistant Coach Joshua Eargle was honored as the winner of the Rare Disease Champion Award last year.

The Uplifting Athletes Rare Disease Champion Team is a member of the National College Football Awards Association. The NCFAA encompasses the most prestigious awards in college football. Founded in 1997, the NCFAA and its 25 awards now boast over 800 recipients, dating to 1935.

Chapter Update: Princeton finishes strong and six teams post Week 13 victories


Princeton needed a lot of help to get a share of the 2019 Ivy League crown. All the Tigers could control in the scenario was get a victory over Penn at historic Franklin Field in Philadelphia.

Led by 172 rushing yards from RB Collin Eaddy and a defense that blanked the Quakers over the final 52 minutes, Princeton overwhelmed Penn to post a three-touchdown victory.

However, Princeton did not earn a share of the Ancient Eight crown this season after winning the title outright in 2018. Dartmouth and Yale ended up sharing the 2019 Ivy League title. But the Tigers did finish 8-2 overall and put together the best two-season run for the program in nearly 70 years.

For the ninth time since the Ivy League went to a 10-game schedule in 1980, Princeton won at least eight games. When you factor in a 10-0 season a year ago, the Tigers reached 18 wins over a two-year span for the first time since 1950-51.

Penn senior running back Karekin Brooks finished off his career with 95 yards against the Tigers to end the season with 1,003 yards. Brooks becomes only the 12th player in the Quakers’ 144-year history to eclipse 1,000 yards and the first since 2006.

The Penn and Princeton programs joined forces for the second consecutive year to make this game an Uplifting Athletes Rare Disease Awareness Game by wearing helmet stickers with the Uplifting Athletes logo and #WeTackleRare wristbands to signify their unified commitment to one cause.

They also hosted two exceptional rare disease families who are having an impact on the Rare Disease Community. Dr. David Fajgenbaum and his family and the Combs family were recognized as part of the Rare Disease Awareness Game celebration.

Baylor: Two years ago the Bears were 1-11 and lost all six of their home games. Today, Baylor is headed to the Big 12 Championship game after posting its first win over Texas in their last five meetings. Sparked by a defense that limited a Texas offense that had scored at least 21 points in 28 straight games to only 10 points, Baylor posted its sixth 10-win season in program history. The Bears’ defense had five sacks and now has 38 for the season led by defensive end James Lynch. The junior had 2.0 sacks against the Longhorns to move into the No. 1 spot in program history for career sacks with 19. The previous mark was 17.5 held by Shawn Oakman. Lynch has 10.5 sacks this season and is one sack away from establishing a new school mark for sacks in a single season.

Northwestern: Playing his final game at Ryan Field, Wildcats senior defensive end Joe Gaziano recorded two sacks – the first one for a safety – to become the all-time sack leader at Northwestern with 29. The previous mark of 27 career sacks had stood for 21 years. Gaziano earned the Uplifting Athletes Rare Performance of the Week.

Kent State: The Golden Flashes kept their bid for a bowl game alive courtesy of kicker Matthew Trickett’s third game winning field goal this season, and second in as many games. This one came from 22 yards out with 19 seconds remaining. Kent State quarterback Dustin Crum had a monster game. The junior became the first Golden Flashes QB to throw for more than 300 yards and eclipse 100 yards rushing since 2004. His 470 yards of total offense was the most for Kent State since Jose Davis posted 474 against Akron in 1997 and his 369 yards through the air was the first time since 2014 a Kent State signal caller eclipsed 350 yards. Kent State is 5-6 and plays at Eastern Michigan on Black Friday.

Learn more about Stony Brook Chapter President and tight end Zach Lucas in our Beyond The Trophy series

Notre Dame: Sparked by three touchdown passes from quarterback Ian Book, the Fighting Irish exploded for 24 unanswered points in the second half to subdue Boston College on Senior Day in South Bend. Notre Dame’s defense limited the Eagles to fewer than 200 total yards. Junior tight end Cole Kmet tied the Notre Dame record for touchdown receptions in a season (six) by a tight end with his 11-yard scoring catch in the third quarter. The only other tight end to catch six touchdown passes in a season was Ken McAfee in 1977.

Marist: In his final game, redshirt senior Andrew McElroy secured a victory for the Red Foxes with a 90-yard interception return in the final minute to give Marist a 12-point lead. He jumped an out route and raced down the sideline for his first career interception. 

Fordham: The Rams ended a four-game slide – three of those losses were by single digits – behind a defense that did not allow any points in a convincing victory over Bucknell. All the Bison’s points came on defensive touchdowns. Trey Sneed had a pair of second-half touchdown runs as Fordham posted the only 21 points after intermission. Freshman wide receiver DeQuence Carter had a season-high 10 catches. His 10 grabs gave Carter 53 for the season to establish a new single-season catch record for a freshman at Fordham. The previous mark of 48 catches was established in 2000.

Chapter Update: Northwestern freshman has breakout performance and 12 teams post Week 12 victories


Behind a breakout performance from true freshman running back Evan Hull, Northwestern won its second game of the season by rolling up 45 points against UMass.

Hull, making his first start of the season, rushed for 220 yards and tied the single-game program record with four touchdowns on the ground. He became the first Wildcat running back to rush for four touchdowns and more than 200 yards in a game since 2005. Hull scored on touchdown runs of 46, 38, 36 and 6 yards.

Northwestern also used a strong effort from its special teams to add points to the scoreboard. Joe Gaziano blocked a 30-yard field goal attempt and Chris Bergin grabbed the loose ball and scooted 85-yards for a scoop-and-score. The Wildcats also recovered a squib kick and turned it into a field goal.

Penn State: Junior quarterback Sean Clifford, the Penn State Chapter President, went over 3,000 total yards for the season and was responsible for three touchdowns as the Nittany Lions bounced back from their first loss of the season. Clifford, who posted 234 total yards of offense, two rushing scores and a passing touchdown against the Hoosiers, finished off a statement drive for Penn State to seal the victory. His 1-yard plunge on fourth down late in the fourth quarter gave the Nittany Lions a 10-point lead and capped an 18-play, 75-yard march that consumed 9:01 of the clock. 

Saint Francis: Redshirt sophomore quarterback Jason Brown connected with classmate E.J. Jenkins for three touchdowns to help the Red Flash post their most convincing win of the season. Joel Denley added 157 all-purpose yards and a career-high three rushing touchdowns as part of the 42-point outburst. Saint Francis Chapter President Nick Rinella, one of six seniors honored prior to the game, posted eight tackles and returned the opening kickoff 48 yards. 

In his first year as the starter, Brown’s three touchdown passes against Wagner gives him 23 on the season to take over as the program’s all-time leader in TD passes for a season and earned him the Uplifting Athletes Rare Performance of the Week.

Penn: The Quakers went on the road to Harvard and set a program milestone in close-to-the-vest Ivy League victories. For the first time in the Ancient Eight era of college football, Penn has won three consecutive games at Harvard Stadium. It was also the third straight win overall for the Quakers, all decided by four points or fewer. Six of Penn’s nine games this season have been decided by five or fewer points. The Quakers are 4-2 in those tight-squeeze affairs. Nick Robinson threw a 16-yard touchdown pass to Rory Starkey midway through the fourth quarter to give the Quakers the lead for good. And the Penn defense locked it down with a late fourth-quarter stop on fourth down at its own 30-yard-line.

Clemson: Behind a career-high four touchdowns from sophomore quarterback Trevor Lawrence and 121 yards from RB Travis Etienne, the Tigers won their sixth consecutive game by 30 or more points – the longest streak in ACC history. Etienne’s 100-plus yard game was his sixth in a row and established a school record for consecutive 100-plus yard games. Wake Forest walked into Memorial Stadium bringing seven wins to the table behind a solid offense. The Tigers’ defense held the Demon Deacons to 105 total yards and five first downs.

Davidson: The Wildcats finished off the road portion of their schedule with a stellar 4-1 mark thanks to 28 unanswered second-half points to pull away from Stetson. Davidson moved to 5-2 in the Pioneer Football League, posting the most league wins by the program since 2006. Junior RB Wesley Dugger continued his assault on the record books with two more touchdowns to become the PFL’s all-time leading scorer and the Davidson single-season leader in rushing touchdowns with 20. Davidson Chapter President and team captain, linebacker George Hatalowich, led a defense that limited Stetson to less than 100 yards the final 30 minutes with a team-high 11 tackles.

Notre Dame: Senior wide receiver Chase Claypool had four touchdown receptions tying him for the most in a single game in Irish history with Maurice Stovall who caught four against BYU in 2005. Three of those touchdown catches came in the first half in the commanding win over Navy, marking the first time an Irish player has posted three touchdown receptions in a single half since at least 1950. Claypool finished with seven catches for 117 yards. Notre Dame Chapter Vice President and linebacker Drew White had a team-high 10 tackles and a fumble recovery. White now leads the Fighting Irish defense in tackles this season.

Learn more about Notre Dame Chapter Vice President and linebacker Drew White in our Beyond The Trophy series

Colgate: Sparked by a defense that found its stride late in the season, the Raiders closed out their 2019 season with three straight victories after blanking Lafayette on the road. It was the third straight season Colgate has blanked Lafayette. After starting 0-7, the Raiders won four of their last five and finished 3-3 in the Patriot League behind a defense that allowed only 27 total points the final 12 quarters of the season.

Syracuse: Fueled by its defense, Syracuse ended its four-game slide and kept its hopes for a bowl bid alive by posting its first win ever against Duke in four tries. Leading 14-6 at halftime, the Orange defense forced three turnovers in the third quarter that the offense turned into 21 points to break the game open. Andre Cisco started the turnover barrage with the first pick-six of his career covering 48 yards that quickly made it 21-6. The 43-point margin of victory was the largest ever for Syracuse in an ACC game.

Western Michigan: In a wild back-and-forth affair that saw the Broncos and Ohio University combine for 10 first-half points but then 31 total points in the fourth quarter, LeVante Bellamy’s four-yard touchdown run in overtime sealed the seventh victory of the season for WMU. After the Broncos’ defense surrendered a late touchdown in regulation that forced OT, they came up with a stand to start the extra session to force a field goal.

Kent State: Trailing Buffalo at home by 21 points with half of the fourth quarter remaining, the Golden Flashes exploded for 24 unanswered points down the stretch to keep their quest for a bowl big alive. Sophomore kicker Matthew Trickett nailed a 44-yard field goal as time expired to cap the biggest fourth-quarter comeback this season in FBS. The field goal to win it by Trickett was his 20th of the season and broke the single-season Kent State record established in 2012 by Freddy Cortez. 

Florida State: For the 38th time in the last 40 years the Seminoles will appear in a bowl game after roughing up FCS Alabama State for win No. 6 this season. In his second stint as interim head coach, Odell Haggins is now 4-0 with FSU averaging nearly 43 points a game in those contests. Haggins is 2-0 this season since taking over and the 49 points scored this week is a season high.

Chapter Update: Dramatic comeback makes Illinois bowl eligible and 10 teams post Week 11 victories


With a flair for the dramatic, Illinois became bowl eligible for the first time since 2014 with an improbable come-from-behind victory at Michigan State.

The Illini trailed 28-3 in the second quarter and 31-10 entering the fourth quarter.  In the end, Quarterback Brandon Peters threw a 5-yard touchdown to Daniel Barker with five seconds remaining to complete the rally and seal the victory.

On the final drive, Illinois converted a fourth-and-17 and drew a fourth-down pass interference call in the end zone before scoring. Peters finished with 369 passing yards and three touchdowns.

Wide receiver Josh Imatorbhebhe, a transfer from USC, had four receptions for 178 yards and two touchdowns. The junior’s 178 yards is the most receiving yards by an opponent at Spartan Stadium since at least 2000 and the most by an Illinois player ever in the 47-game series history against Michigan State.

The Illini, who forced four turnovers to help fuel the comeback, have won four straight.

Baylor: The Bears stayed undefeated thanks to a triple overtime victory at TCU. The opportunity to win the game in overtime came courtesy of redshirt freshman kicker John Mayers. His previous long field goal was 38 yards. His career-best 51-yard kick with 36 seconds remaining in regulation pulled the Bears level at 9-9. Charlie Brewer’s 4-yard TD pass to Denzel Mims in the third OT was the game winner. Baylor is 9-0 for the second time in program history after opening the 2013 season with nine victories in a row.

Penn: The Quakers’ eventual game winning touchdown early in the fourth quarter came on a trick play that started in the hands of the backup quarterback who threw back to a transfer quarterback/returner/receiver who then uncorked an 80-yard touchdown pass to a converted defensive back who’d never caught a touchdown before. The long distance catch-and-run by Eric Markes from Owen Goldsberry gave Penn a 21-14 lead. Cornell scored a touchdown to cap a 16-play, 94-yard drive with 50 seconds remaining to pull to within a point. The Big Red opted to go for the win with a 2-point conversion, but Penn freshman DB Kendren Smith knocked down the pass to preserve the victory.

Notre Dame: Senior quarterback Ian Book threw four touchdown passes and rushed for 149 yards in the win over Duke to become the first player in Notre Dame history to rush for more than 100 yards in a game and throw four touchdown passes. Notre Dame Chapter Vice President and linebacker Drew White led the Irish with seven total tackles including a sack and a tackle for a loss.

Learn more about Notre Dame Chapter Vice President and tight end Brock Wright in our Beyond The Trophy series

Davidson: On a day when the Wildcats rushing attack rolled up more than 450 yards and amassed a 33-point second quarter, this victory was also one for the program record books. Junior running back Wesley Dugger took over as the all-time leading rusher in school history as part of his 118-yard effort in the win over Butler. Dugger moved past John Leverett’s mark of 3,165 yards posted in 2004 to earn the Uplifting Athletes Rare Performance of the Week. Davidson Chapter President and linebacker George Hatalowich had six tackles for a defense that limited Butler to one touchdown and only 257 total yards.

Western Michigan: Senior quarterback Jon Wassink had a career-high 131 rushing yards in the victory over Ball State. Wassink became the first WMU quarterback to rush for more than 100 yards since Paul Jorgenson had 128 against Northern Illinois in 1973. The victory made the Broncos bowl eligible for the sixth consecutive season. WMU also completed its third undefeated season at home since 2000. 

Clemson: Running back Travis Etienne added three more touchdowns to his career resume in the victory over NC State to pass C.J. Spiller’s mark of 51 career touchdowns and take over as the all-time leader at Clemson with 54 career touchdowns. His 50 career rushing touchdowns is tied for second most in ACC history. Sophomore quarterback Trevor Lawrence threw for 276 yards and three touchdowns. It was the fifth consecutive game Lawrence threw at least three touchdowns passes to become the first quarterback in school history to pass for three scores in five straight games.

Florida State: The Seminoles scored 14 unanswered points in a 45-second span inside the final two minutes of the fourth quarter to pull away from Boston College. D.J. Matthews’ 60-yard touchdown pass from James Blackman with 1:48 to play made it 31-24 FSU. Jordan Travis made it a two-score game with a 66-yard gallop only 45 seconds later to extend the lead to 38-24. Blackman finished with 369 passing yards and wide receiver Terry Tamorrion had seven catches for 156 yards and a touchdown.

Colgate: Quarterback Grant Breneman rushed for a career-high 105 yards and added 195 yards through the air with a touchdown to help the Raiders notch their first home victory of the season with a win over Fordham. Colgate’s defense limited the visiting Rams to only 33 rushing yards and 208 total yards. The Raiders’ defense also added five tackles for a loss and three sacks.

Eastern Illinois: The Panthers used a furious second-half comeback that included a third-quarter successful onside kick to rally past Tennessee State for their first win of the season. EIU outscored TSU 28-3 in the second half after falling behind 35-21 at intermission. Darshon McCullough led a pair of Panthers running backs with 155 yards on 17 carries with a touchdown.

Chapter Update: Last-second field goal propels Penn to come-from-behind victory and nine teams notch Week 10 wins


On a milestone day, where Penn played the 1,400th game in program history, the Quakers first Ivy League victory of the season came in dramatic fashion at Franklin Field.

Sophomore kicker Daniel Karrash made his first collegiate field goal attempt a memorable one, as the Philadelphia native drilled a 22-yard kick with two seconds remaining to vault the Quakers past Brown.

Junior linebacker Brian O’Neill gave Penn a 35-19 lead early in the third quarter with a 21-yard scoop and score on a fumble. After that, the Quakers’ offense sputtered and Brown scored 17 unanswered points to surge in front 36-35 with 4:10 to play.

Penn went on a 16-play, 74-yard victory march, including a fourth-and-7 conversion, to set up Karrash’s dramatic winning kick.

Notre Dame: Staring down the barrel of an upset by Virginia Tech at Notre Dame Stadium, the Fighting Irish’s struggling offense climbed off the deck in the dying minutes to rally for a one-point victory over the Hokies. Notre Dame, held scoreless in the second half up to this point, manufactured an 18-play, 87-yard drive in the final 3:22 to win it. Quarterback Ian Book capped the march with a seven-yard touchdown run with 29 seconds to play. Notre Dame Chapter President and linebacker Drew White led the Irish defense with eight tackles.

Marist: Running back Hunter Cobb had another big outing, as the Red Foxes won for the second consecutive week. The redshirt freshman accounted for 148 of Marist’s 166 yards on the ground and scored three touchdowns. In leading the Red Foxes to back-to-back victories, Cobb has rushed for 324 yards and scored five times.

Clemson: Running back Travis Etienne rushed for a career 212 yards and the Tigers extended their nation best win streak to 24 games. Clemson scored 59 points in the victory to mark the fourth game in a row the Tigers have scored 45 or more points – the first time in program history that has happened. They also tied the school record for consecutive home victories with 21. Etienne’s 212 yards came on the fewest carries in school history (9), he reached 1,000 yards in the fewest number of games (9) to tie the school record and the senior also broke the school record for career rushing touchdowns with an 86-yard gallop to earn the Uplifting Athletes Rare Performance of the Week.

Baylor: Backstopped by a defense that surrendered the fewest rushing yards allowed by a Bears team in more than four years, Baylor edged West Virginia at home to stay undefeated. The 8-0 Bears moved up in the polls to No. 11. Baylor’s defense gave up only 14 rushing yards and fewer than 225 total yards to win its first game when scoring fewer than 20 points since 2006. 

Davidson: The Wildcats never trailed, but it was a grind for the home squad against a pesky one-win Valparaiso outfit. Wesley Dugger’s 1-yard touchdown run with two minutes to play snapped a 21-all deadlock. And Davidson Chapter co-founder and President George Hatalowich iced the six-point victory with an interception inside the final minute. The victory guarantees Davidson back-to-back seasons with at least six victories for the first time since 2006 and 2007. Hatalowich finished with a team-high nine tackles.

Princeton: The Tigers ran their winning streak to 17 straight, cracking the Top Five for winning streaks during the program’s 150-year history. Princeton’s defense limited Cornell to seven points, forced three turnovers and surrendered only one third-down conversion in 11 attempts.

Learn more about Penn State Chapter Vice President and long snapper Chris Stoll in our Beyond The Trophy series

Illinois: For the first time since 2011 when they started 6-0, the Fighting Illini are on a three-game winning streak. Senior linebacker Dele Harding became the second player in the nation in the last 20 years to have 12-plus tackles, 2.0-plus tackles for a loss, 1-plus interception and 1-plus touchdown in a single game in the victory over Rutgers. Tied 10-10 at intermission, Illinois scored all 28 points in the second half to pull away.

Colgate: Two big punt returns by Abu Daramy-Swaray covering 78 total yards and the Raiders’ defense forced a pair of key second-half fumbles that led to points for victory No. 16 in 17 games against Georgetown.