Rare Disease Research Uplifting Athletes helped fund translating to support COVID-19 fight


Pictured above are University of Pennsylvania researchers Dr. Alberto Japp, ’20 Young Investigator Draft Class (second from left) and Dr. David Fajgenbaum, ’18 Young Investigator Draft Class (third from left). 

We are discovering more every day about the vital role rare disease research plays, not only for those affected by rare diseases, but also for those impacted by more common illnesses as well.

Translational and collaborative research Uplifting Athletes helped fund through its Young Investigator Draft is impacting Castleman Disease patients and provides relative science for COVID-19 patients.

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, home of the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), recently announced they know what’s happening at the cellular level of the immune system when cytokine storms occur, and the answer not only informs future potential Castleman therapies, but may also provide new insight into why similar events take place in COVID-19 patients.

The researchers recently published their findings in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight.

“This is why we launched the Young Investigator Draft initiative. We wanted to elevate and fund these incredible researchers to allow them to do what they do best, use the power of science to change the lives of those in the rare disease community we serve,” Uplifting Athletes Executive Director Rob Long said. “We always understood the potential of what could be unlocked by supporting rare disease research. But we were thrilled to learn of the impact that this research was having during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We are proud to support the incredible researchers at the Castleman Disease Collaborative led by Dr. David Fajgenbaum through the Young Investigator Draft.”  

Uplifting Athletes established the Young Investigator Draft to fund bright young investigative researchers performing collaborative and translational research in order to positively impact treatments and potential cures for the entire Rare Disease Community.

Dr. David Fajgenbaum is the senior author of the study and was part of the inaugural Young Investigator Draft class in 2018. Fajgenbaum is the Executive Director of the Center for Study & Treatment of Lymphadenopathies & Cytokine Storms, assistant professor of Translational Medicine and Human Genetics, Executive Director of the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), and a Castleman patient himself.

“With iMCD, just as with COVID-19, it is the body’s hyper-response that’s deadly rather than the disease itself, and this study gives us new clues about why the immune cells are out of control and what we can do to rein them in,” Dr. Fajgenbaum said.

He also says he hopes this work will prompt others in the field to consider different ways to approach the cytokine storms COVID-19 patients are experiencing. A provisional patent has been filed for a new treatment approach involving inhibition of JAK based on this work.

The published study was funded by the CDCN, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Hematologic Malignancies Translational Center of Excellence of the Abramson Cancer Center and Uplifting Athletes.

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