Meet 2020 Uplifting Athletes Young Investigator Draft presented by CSL Behring Collaborative Leadership Award recipient Dr. Benjamin Chan


The Young Investigator Draft is the result of Uplifting Athletes’ ongoing commitment to cultivate resources that accelerate scientific advancements for rare disease treatments and potential cures while facilitating the next generation of rare disease researchers.

To learn more about the 2020 Young Investigator Draft presented by CSL Behring and to purchase tickets click here.

Researcher: Dr. Benjamin Chan

Mentor: Dr. Paul Turner

Young Investigator Institution: Yale University

Education: Dr. Chan spent five years at the University of Utah obtaining his undergraduate degree in Behavioral Biology before obtaining his PhD in Microbiology in 2008. After working at the University of Utah hospital as a scientist, Dr. Chan landed a position in the Turner Lab at Yale University in 2013 and is currently an Associate Research Scientist in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.  

Research: In the Turner Lab at Yale University, Dr. Chan works on using phage to treat bacterial infections. This is known as phage therapy. Since the discovery of bacteriophages over 100 years ago, there have been numerous attempts at using them in the clinic to treat bacterial infections. A lot of this work took place in the former Soviet Union and was largely ignored by the West as we developed and deployed highly effective (at the time) broad spectrum antibiotics. However, as the effectiveness of these antibiotics decreases, we are once again considering phages as a potential therapeutic. A lot has changed and science has advanced significantly since the initial discovery allowing our team to better understand bacteria-phage interactions which should enable us to deploy them more successfully. For example, we now have the tools to identify what surface expressed proteins or sugars particular phage are using to adsorb to their bacterial hosts. This is a critical piece of information that’s essential when designing a treatment plan. We can also characterize, at the molecular level, the ways in which bacteria evolve resistance to phage infection, allowing us to predict, and capitalize upon, what will happen during the course of therapy.

In Their Words: “When it comes to Paul as a mentor in the lab, what stands out first and foremost is his science. His science is simply amazing. He is very approachable and you can ask him anything. He doesn’t have an ego. Paul is genuinely a friendly and happy guy.”

A native of Seattle who spent most of his life in Salt Lake City, Dr. Chan was interested in being a scientist since he was in kindergarten. When asked if ever considered anything else, Dr. Chan’s simple answer was an emphatic “no”.

“I’m your classic case of one of my parents brought home a microscope when I was very young and it was game over. I was hooked,” Dr. Chan said. “It has always been all about science and medicine for me.”

Research scientists are problem solvers and explorers and usually possess an adventurous spirit when it comes to their work. They have to be great thinkers and detail oriented at the same time, but also not be afraid to fail.

And as they hone their craft and a niche inside the vast world of science and research, working alongside a mentor that brings out the best in them as scientists can be a difference maker.

For young investigator research scientists like Dr. Chan, when he decided to make his move it was all about the lab mentor and the science that was being done in that lab.

For him the lab at the top of his list was Dr. Paul Turner’s at Yale University.

“As a scientist you look around and ask around and talk to people. You put together a list and shop around. It’s a competitive process. Working in Paul’s lab with him was at the top of my list,” said Dr. Chan, who has how many? children and is scheduled to marry his fiancé, Joanna Bingham, in England later this year. “The science being done in his lab is amazing, like I said. But it’s Paul the person that sealed it for me. It was a combination of both the science and the person that brought me to the frozen Northeast from Utah.”

After working in Dr. Turner’s lab for nearly seven years, Dr. Chan has discovered that science is extremely important. But it’s the group of people that Dr. Turner assembles together that is the real difference maker.

“I’ve learned from Paul that you have to have a really nice team around you. The right people really does matter,” Dr. Chan said. “He understands that when you have that right group of people, you can do some really cool work.”Dr. Chan and Dr. Turner were selected for the 2020 Uplifting Athletes’ Young Investigator Draft Collaborative Leadership Award in partnership with Emily’s Entourage. Emily’s Entourage accelerates research and drug development for nonsense mutations of Cystic Fibrosis. By providing critical leadership and coordination, Emily’s Entourage drives high-impact research, cultivates multi-stakeholder collaboration, and facilitates information exchange to speed breakthroughs.

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